Centre for Community Child Health

Promoting resilience—early primary teachers

  • Grow resilience teachers

     

    Your relationship with each child in your classroom offers an opportunity to support that child’s resilience.

     

    Relationships really count

    Positive relationships lay the foundations for resilience. By getting to know each child well and learning about them and their family, you can develop an awareness of and sensitivity to them and their needs. 

    That relationship can help them to understand who they are, as well as emotions, communication, behaviour, how to treat others and how they can expect to be treated.

    Personal qualities and skills for resilience

    Positive relationships help children to feel safe and secure in the world and build their confidence and courage to dive into new experiences and interactions.

    Also in this edition

    Resilience in childhood

    Promoting resilience:

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    This courage helps them to develop the personal qualities and skills of resilience. Getting to know each child well makes it possible to see areas where they might need a bit of extra support.

    Look out for and plan interactions and experiences in your class that will build children’s:

    Personal qualities and skills for resilience 
    Ideas…
    Self-esteem Look out for children who need a gentle nudge to contribute in class—playing an active role in the classroom can nurture a sense of achievement and pride. That doesn’t have to mean being the first to put their hand up, what about taking a message to front office or joining a team to paint a mural?

    Knowing that it is ok to make mistakes is vital for all children. Try being direct about this at the start of the school year and regularly talking about how to make sure no student feels afraid of making mistakes.
    Optimism Offer encouragement and positive feedback as kids in your classroom deal with challenges – show that you believe in them.
    Realistic sense of personal control  Applying problem-solving and decision-making skills can help children to know that they can make a meaningful impact in their own world. Foster a strong sense of ownership through setting challenging projects, or encouraging kids to work as a team to raise awareness of an issue that they care about.

    Information for parents

    You might like to share our Grow & Thrive information for parents of 5-8 year old children with parents or caregivers of children at your school—these are packed with information and fun tips about resilience.

    Where to find help

    There are lots of other resources that you can share with families from KidsMatter and Raising Children Network. When more help is needed, families can also speak with family doctors, counsellors or psychologists.

    Also in this edition

    Resilience in childhood

    Promoting resilience:

    Sign up to the Grow & Thrive newsletter

       Gandel Philanthropy