CCCH art

About us

  • At the Centre for Community Child Health, we want the best possible outcomes for children, families and communities. We know that the health and prosperity of our communities and our nation depends on the types of environments and experiences our children have in their early years, starting from conception. If we want children to be healthy, well and to develop the capabilities they will need to become participating, contributing adults, we need to invest wisely in these early years. Early investment is crucial, because it means we can prevent problems from occurring in the first place, or we can intervene early to stop problems becoming more entrenched and more difficult (and costly) to address.  

    Around 1 in 5 children are arriving at Australian primary schools developmentally vulnerable.

    This means that around 20% of Australia’s children have not had the experiences or environments they need for healthy development. We know that those who start behind are at risk of staying behind, and are also at greater risk of having health, social and emotional problems in adulthood. 

    While this statistic is concerning, we are optimistic that outcomes for children, families and communities can be improved. We believe that: 

    • many conditions and common problems faced by children are preventable or can be improved if they are recognised and managed early
    • the best results are achieved where professionals work in close partnership with parents who are supported and empowered to make the best choices for their children
    • supporting and strengthening community-based professionals and organisations ensures the best chance of good outcomes for children and their families.
    • academic institutions can play a major role in contributing to public policy, as well as facilitating integration and continuity between preventive and curative health care, and between hospitals and community-based services
    • up-to-date research and evidence of what has shown to be effective and appropriate should inform policy formulation for children and families, the organisation of clinical services, professional practice with children and families, and community development
    • we have a responsibility to determine which prevention and early detection/intervention approaches work for children and families, and to document their benefits and costs.

    Our work

    Established in 1994, the Centre for Community Child Health at The Royal Children’s Hospital and the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute provides leadership at community, state, national and international levels on the health and wellbeing of children aged 0 – 8 years. The Centre strives to:

    • improve health and development outcomes for all Australian children
    • advance equitable health and development outcomes for our most vulnerable and disadvantaged children
    • promote positive early life conditions for children, in order to reduce the many later life problems that have their origins in early childhood.    
    We do this by:

    • finding, synthesising and translating the best international evidence to inform policy, service delivery, professional practice and parenting
    • designing robust service systems and platforms to catalyse and support innovation and change. 

    21st anniversary celebration

    On 26 November 2015, the Centre for Community Child Health celebrated 21 years of working to improve outcomes for children, families and communities. The evening’s formalities included accolades from Professor Christine Kilpatrick, CEO of The Royal Children’s Hospital, and Professor Kathryn North, Director of the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, followed by the inspirational words of our special guest, The Honourable Quentin Bryce. Read more about the CCCH 21st anniversary event.

    As part of the year's celebrations, we have put together a short video of our vision, our achievements and our hopes for the future. 



 

Murdoch Childrens Research Institute

The Centre for Community Child Health is a department of The Royal Children’s Hospital and a research group of Murdoch Childrens Research Institute.